Click on Member Name to View More Details

Lecture – The Influence of Religion on American Society

Professor, Alfred Hunt
Tuesdays, September 8, 15, 22, 29, October 6, 13th
10:30 am – 11:30 am

Online with Zoom
The United States is the most religiously diverse country in the world. We will consider the role that religion (Judaism, Islam, and Christianity) has played in our national life, including its influence on politics, education and morality. Topics include: early religious foundations in western civilization, religion and the Founding Fathers, the re-emergence of fundamentalism, the unique American-Israeli relationship, and the effects of increasing secularization.

The fee for the six-week series is $75.

Lecture – The Influence of Religion on American Society

Professor, Alfred Hunt
Tuesdays, September 8, 15, 22, 29, October 6, 13th
10:30 am – 11:30 am

Online with Zoom
The United States is the most religiously diverse country in the world. We will consider the role that religion (Judaism, Islam, and Christianity) has played in our national life, including its influence on politics, education and morality. Topics include: early religious foundations in western civilization, religion and the Founding Fathers, the re-emergence of fundamentalism, the unique American-Israeli relationship, and the effects of increasing secularization.

The fee for the six-week series is $75.

Lecture – The Influence of Religion on American Society

Professor, Alfred Hunt
Tuesdays, September 8, 15, 22, 29, October 6, 13th
10:30 am – 11:30 am

Online with Zoom
The United States is the most religiously diverse country in the world. We will consider the role that religion (Judaism, Islam, and Christianity) has played in our national life, including its influence on politics, education and morality. Topics include: early religious foundations in western civilization, religion and the Founding Fathers, the re-emergence of fundamentalism, the unique American-Israeli relationship, and the effects of increasing secularization.

The fee for the six-week series is $75.

Lecture – The Influence of Religion on American Society

Professor, Alfred Hunt
Tuesdays, September 8, 15, 22, 29, October 6, 13th
10:30 am – 11:30 am

Online with Zoom
The United States is the most religiously diverse country in the world. We will consider the role that religion (Judaism, Islam, and Christianity) has played in our national life, including its influence on politics, education and morality. Topics include: early religious foundations in western civilization, religion and the Founding Fathers, the re-emergence of fundamentalism, the unique American-Israeli relationship, and the effects of increasing secularization.

The fee for the six-week series is $75.

Conversations @the Loft

Guest Speaker, Margaret Gibson
Thursday, September 17th
1 pm – 2:30 pm

Connecticut Poet Laureate, Author, Professor Emerita, Margaret Gibson
“Margaret Gibson has created a voice and an art that connect the sensuous experience of the physical world with the inner life,” Pattiann Rogers has written. Nationally and internationally acclaimed, Margaret Gibson poetry is characterized by an uncommon diversity. The voice may be predominantly lyrical and meditative, and yet there are award-winning, book-length narratives in which she fully inhabits the consciousness of her personae. Hers is “a finely crafted lyricism and attention to detail rare among poets today,” wrote Brian Henry. Gibson herself has said, “Writing poetry is an act of attention and receptivity. You study whatever it is that strikes your attention—whether a scarlet tanager, river, field, or forest, whether mother, daughter, alcoholic, photographer, lover. You take what’s given into that part of the self that inquires, test, embraces, and embodies. Outer and inner coalesce and fuse.”

“Everything is ultimately connected; everything, therefore, is both personal and impersonal. We’re part of an enormous, sometimes painful, sometimes joyful experience of unfolding Consciousness.”

“We’re here to find the things that are broken and to mend them, to find where there is fracture or division and to create a wholeness.”

Also the author of a memoir about growing up in Richmond, Virginia, Gibson has lived for forty years in Preston, Connecticut, with her husband, writer David McKain. She has taught in many colleges and universities, at the undergraduate and graduate levels.

About Margaret Gibson

A resident of Preston, CT, Margaret Gibson– a professor emerita at UConn –-is the state’s seventh Poet Laureate.

A nationally and internationally acclaimed writer, Gibson is the author of 12 books of poetry, as well as the memoir “The Prodigal Daughter: Reclaiming an Unfinished Childhood.” Awards include the Lamont Selection from the Academy of American Poets, the Melville Kane Award from the Poetry Society of America as a co-winner, the Connecticut Center for the Book Award in Poetry and three Pushcart Prizes 1993. The Vigil was a Finalist for the National Book Award in Poetry. Broken Cup was a Finalist for The Poet’s Prize.

The panelists who selected Gibson as Connecticut’s Poet Laureate, stated, “ Throughout a long, distinguished career as poet, educator, and activist for peace and justice, Margaret Gibson’s lyric poetry interrogates and illumines the connection between our inner and outer worlds. Her 12 collections exhibit intelligence, meditative reflection, and an ever-deepening courage to reckon with uncertain…As Connecticut Poet Laureate, she will encourage and listen to the voices of others and bring to the position a demonstrated dedication to building an engaged, caring community.”

Also the author of a memoir about growing up in Richmond, Virginia, Gibson has lived for forty years in Preston, Connecticut, with her husband, writer David McKain. She has taught in many colleges and universities, at the undergraduate and graduate levels.

Admission is complimentary for Thread Members and $5 for guests. Please use the drop-down menu when registering.

Registration is required by Wednesday, September 16th to receive the Zoom link.